The growing movement for a living wage and justice for fast-food and other low-wage workers will reach another milestone next week with a nationwide strike set for Aug. 29.

Following the success and public support of a walkout in eight cities earlier this month, those workers and the community, faith and labor groups that back them are calling on fast-food and low-wage retail workers across the nation to join them in the fight for $15 an hour and the right to form a union without retaliation.

The strike is set for the day after the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. One of the historic march’s demands was to "give all Americans a decent standard of living," and it called for a minimum wage of $2 per hour. Adjusted for inflation, that would equal $15.26 an hour today.

Nancy Salgado, a single mother of two who has worked at McDonald’s in Chicago for 10 years and makes Illinois’ minimum wage of $8.25 an hour, says:

We are united in our belief that every job should pay workers enough to meet basic needs such as food and housing. Our families, communities and economy all depend on workers earning a living wage.


Fast food is a $200 billion a year industry and retail is a $4.7 trillion industry, yet many service workers across the country earn minimum wage or just above it and are forced to rely on public assistance programs to provide for their families and get health care for their children. The median age in the fast-food industry is older than 28 and more than one-quarter of fast-food workers are raising at least one child.

Learn more at Low Pay Is Not OK.

This piece first appeared in calaborfed.org